About

IMG_0850.JPG
Born 1984, Rio de Janeiro 

Lives and works in Oregon

olivamilla33@gmail.com

 

 

3D Drawings

Humble materials — styrofoam, cardboard, much of it found or cast-off —    drive artistic curiosity. Curiosity drives creation. With no preconceived guidelines, I select and manipulate objects as to endow them with new, unexpected purpose and interest. I commit to the materials, and respond to their particular qualities. I make small decisions about them; how they relate to one another, their relative positions, their history, their weight.  A decision can be as small as moving an object an inch closer to another object. 

The constructions act as complete thoughts. They stimulate mental connections in terms of the relations of the varied materials and the way we relate to known objects in the real world. Elements may be recycled, readdressed or appear in a completely different context. Each new work is developed from a preceding one, reflecting on the idea that the virtue or an object does not lie on its physical qualities, but on the potential it has to ignite other creations. When closely observed, materials begin to assert their own brand of order. 

 

Notes on Painting

There is a history I feel, but I don`t remember. I paint to stir those memories, to instigate them, and to give them form.

Paintings often begins with gestural impulses. Like entering a sacred circle of dance in my native Brazil, the first gesture asks for permission. As in dance, my body is connected to movement that is historical, but in the moment of expression, that history is mine. 

Often, my mark-making takes the form of text or words. I wonder what is behind words, and where the impulse for language comes from. Having been exposed to different languages, religions, cultures and systems of truths, my paintings are a way to develop new orders of truth, as well as to recover inherited wisdom. 

My process embraces different kinds of thinking without hesitation. Intuition, reasoning, and following what the hands do are some of the ways in which I find both reassurance and conflict in making. I utilize color, texture, layering, rhythm, a sensitivity to time, waiting, and I allow gravity to exhibit its power. Aesthetic choices are guided by a need to cultivate and absorb nourishment. The difference between the two is not always clear.

The construction of the paintings is like the mixing of perfume, which is perceived attractive for its floral notes, but contains small doses of rot. Elements of flora and fauna enter the works as fragments. In forgoing their real-world specificity, they become tools for new propositions in how I relate to surrounding environments today.